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  • Ginette Rhodes Therapy

This article speaks brilliantly on what I believe about Therapy and Healing Justice

https://www.talkspace.com/blog/mental-health-is-political/

Please read the whole article. Here are some snippets:


"Healing justice challenges everyone in the mental health field to acknowledge that wellness isn’t just individual: it is inherently political. That’s because our health is shaped by our identities and our access to resources. But that’s also because the mental health establishment itself has long been complicit in the criminalization and abuse of marginalized people in the United States, especially communities color and LGBTQ communities.

In order to truly do no harm, therapists must acknowledge this history. They also must develop crucial skills to not just affirm marginalized clients, but to support the reality that healing goes beyond individualized treatment and encompasses the lived, political and economic conditions of our world."



"Mental health is expansive: it is shaped by all the histories and systems that shape how we experience the world. That’s why, according to healing justice practitioners, we can only achieve well-being through systemic change."



"Healing justice emphasizes the historical violence — such as colonization and slavery — and contemporary oppression — such as the prison industrial complex — that shape collective well-being.

“Our mental health is impacted by our entire ecosystem,” said Yolo Akili Robinson, Founder and Executive Director of Black Emotional and Mental Health Collective, a group of wellness workers dedicated to the healing of Black communities. “Healing justice really says in order for us to heal, we must transform the entire ecosystem.”

Healing justice challenges everyone in the mental health field to acknowledge that wellness isn’t just individual: it is inherently political. That’s because our health is shaped by our identities and our access to resources. But that’s also because the mental health establishment itself has long been complicit in the criminalization and abuse of marginalized people in the United States, especially communities color and LGBTQ communities.

In order to truly do no harm, therapists must acknowledge this history. They also must develop crucial skills to not just affirm marginalized clients, but to support the reality that healing goes beyond individualized treatment and encompasses the lived, political and economic conditions of our world."



As a practitioner, this is the motto I choose to live by. Therapy IS political.

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